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Serbia: last wave of communist heritage in action epos_print_logo.png
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Serbia: last wave of communist heritage in action

 
Tuesday, 15 May 2012 20:40
 
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by Dragan Djokovic (EPOS)
EPOS Insights


“Corruption is our country’s middle name” - Miroslav Prokopijevic , political analyst, said after the general elections in Serbia. Throughout the whole Balkan region, corruption trend in the sphere of public acquisitions has reached a very high level in the last couple of years. However, Serbian system is still gaining momentum, in spite of strict remonstrations from the European Commission, anti-corruption bodies and the media in the country.

This had a sizeable effect on the current election process in Serbia. Government apparatus stands as a strong network in silent defense of the corruptive system developed over the decades of the communist and the so called self-managed society. It is an apparatus that did not go down with Slobodan Milosevic. Instead, it became a fully matured shrew during the transition. The Delegation of European Commission in Belgrade made numerous reports about this issue during the past couple of years. Reports documents a figure of around one billion euro, even billion and a half. If we distribute this billion over the population of voters who turned out this year to cast the ballots, result might equal the size of the combined electoral body of “political cartel”, as sociologist Vesna Pesic would say.

This is the billion that probably makes a decisive impact on election results by millions reserved for leaders and hundreds for those who are least important. It clearly indicates that this is a society organized around state capital funds, most passionate about personal interests.  Boris Tadic, leader of the Democratic Party (DS), current and most likely the next President of Serbia, is aware of the nature of this society, as well as of the nature of his own party’s approach. He also stated that his own associates who work only for their own benefit are his greatest enemies.

Of course, he did not point a finger at anyone specific and therefore his statement was generally perceived as a part of his presidential campaign to bluff the indecisive voters. He had the same American expert, Edward Golberg as his advisor as  Barack Obama back  in 2008. Tadic’s campaign was a somewhat milder version of Vladimir Putin’s presidential video “Russia without Putin - Apocalypse Tomorrow”, i.e. it was based on the long practice of intimidation of voters by catastrophic prospects of opponent’s victory.

According to Vesna Pesic, this “political cartel” probably prepared the elections to be won by any means necessary, while “President Tadic usurped the government in Serbia just like Milosevic during the nineties.”

She thinks that the opportunity to establish a balance of power in Serbia by interruption of the chain of corruption leading from the President down to the lowest levels is lost. At least in the sense that such opportunity would have been created if current President lost the race.

President Tadic’s third consecutive election victory is expected on Sunday, May 20th 2012, which means that he remains to be the most powerful politician who is going to continue his work on the so called peaceful politics in the Balkans, while cherishing hidden nationalist traits in regard of Albanians, Bosniacs and Croats.  Beside protocolary politics of peace, Tadic did nothing during his last two mandates to open up the perspective of future coexistence of nations with full economic and cultural orientation. That is why President of Croatia, otherwise known for his openness, had no reason to single out Tadic as a preferred candidate for future cooperation, while answering a question about elections in Serbia. “I maintained good cooperation with the current President of Serbia, but I am sure that such cooperation will be maintained with any other candidate elected in ongoing Serbian elections” he said.

Immediately after parliamentary elections, Ivica Dacic, President of the Socialist Party of Serbia (SPS) former close associate of Slobodan Milosevic and current Tadic’s main coalition partner, said: “We don’t know who will be the next President, but we do know who will be the next Premier”. SPS won around 16% and a position which guarantees that either DS or SNS will have to enter into coalition with SPS and make Ivica Dacic a Prime Minister of the Republic of Serbia. Serbian nation dominates the elections in Serbia, which became pretty much an aging society. Candidate lists are consisted of 83% of Serbs and 17% of Hungarians, Bosniacs, Albanians, Roma, etc. 33% of voters are older than 60 years of age.

With all his negative political baggage and history of cohabitation in a corruptive state, he became a crucial figure in this year’s elections as someone with a chance to make a significant impact on the break-up of the diseased system and prevention of its further “development”. At least a glimpse of this chance can be recognized in his statement that this time he “wishes to take off the burden of Milosevic’s heritage”.


Picture under Creative Commons Licence from http://www.balcanicaucaso.org

Last modified on Wednesday, 11 July 2012 13:21

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